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Showing posts from April, 2010

Jakarta EE Survey 2020

At OmniFaces we poll the community from time to time about Java EE (now Jakarta EE) and related technologies. With the transfer of Java EE to Jakarta EE now almost completed, people are now starting to think about Jakarta EE 10 , the first Jakarta EE release after Java EE 8 having new featues. As such it's a good time to poll the community again. In the 2020 edition, there are 4 categories of questions again: Current usage of Java EE / Jakarta EE Servlet containers APIs related to Java EE / Jakarta EE The future of Jakarta EE Compared to 2018, we simplified some of the questions somewhat, omitting some of the less popular options to make it more manageable. We added questions about the future of Jakarta EE and MP together, the preferred Jakarta EE cadence, and generally updated the choices (such as adding Quarkus , which wasn't quite on the radar in 2018 and our own Piranha Cloud ). Jakarta EE provides the opportunity to revitalise and modernise Java EE, but i

Facelets and legacy JSP

It's well known that Facelets is the far superior technology when it comes to authoring pages using JSF. By default, Facelets has no provisions to include content from JSP pages, or Servlets for that matter. Normally this really isn't needed. Facelets provides a better and clearer templating mechanism than what JSP has ever offered. Facelets & JSP in one app However, when migrating a large application you might have to run a while in mixed-mode, that is running with both Facelets and JSP pages in a single application. It ain't pretty, but it is explicitly supported . Ever wondered why you are forced to use prefix mapping for this? Well, the Facelets view handler delegates to the default view handler for createView, which transforms a view ID suffix like .jsf or .xhtml to a default one (e.g. .jsp), but leaves the suffix alone when using a prefix mapping like /faces/*. The Facelets viewhandler later decides to handle a request itself or delegate again to the default