Posts

Implementation components used by Jakarta EE servers

A while ago we looked at which implementation components the various Java EE servers were using. At the time this concerned mostly Java EE 6 servers, with a few Java EE 7 ones thrown in for good measure. Fast forward 6 years, and we have arrived at Jakarta EE 8 essentially (a re-licensing of Java EE 8). Most servers from the previous instalment have Jakarta EE 8 versions out. WebLogic has its Java EE 8 version officially out, with a Jakarta EE 8 version coming soon (there is no technical difference between these two really). TomEE has started to implement Java EE 8 and in its latest version has gotten quite far, but is not there yet. Resin remained at Java EE 6 with seemingly no plans to update these. JOnAS has disappeared off the face of the earth, and so has Geronimo as server (though as a provider of APIs and their implementations it has stayed alive). Without further ado, here's the matrix of Java EE 8/Jakarta EE 8 implementation components used by Java EE/Jakarta EE serve…

New Jakarta EE 8 Certified server: Primeton AppServer V7

Image
Somewhat as a surprise, a company called Primeton Information Technologies, Inc recently filed a certification request for a new Jakarta EE 8 compliant server called Primeton AppServer V7. In this blog we're going to take a quick look at what this server entails. As Jakarta EE is a very complete platform, from scratch implementations are rare to basically non-existent, so it's interesting to see what's exactly in Primeton AppServer V7. Within a Jakarta EE certification request, a link where the product (or a trial thereof) can be downloaded is mandatory, and Primeton indeed provided one. Today's Internet users normally have it easy. One clicks on a download link, and the software effortlessly transfers to your machine. Thanks to 500mbit+ speeds which are becoming increasingly common in this part of the world, most downloads take mere seconds. If you're from a certain age though, you may remember how different this was in the late 80s and early 90s. Dial-up mode…

Piranha 20.1.2 released!

Piranha 20.1.2 has been released :) In total 59 issues were done for this release, which mostly included work for Piranha Micro, but also includes improvements for Servlet compatibility among others. Note that Piranha is a work in progress and not yet ready for regular use, let alone production usage. Piranha itself is an upcoming Jakarta EE and MicroProfile runtime, currently in its early stages of development. Piranha's main goal is to use Jakarta APIs as much as possible as a library, using a flat class loader, and no concept of deploying applications, in other words without being an application server. Piranha Micro however builds on the core Piranha foundation to deliver something that comes closer to a server; it can run a single application in archive form, albeit it can't undeploy and redeploy (this is on purpose). Specifically for embedded use it features an isolated class loader. Contrary to a traditional application server where an isolating class loader is us…

Jan 2020 update: Piranha Micro getting more compatible

We're currently hard at work with our Piranha runtime implementation. Piranha is a new Jakarta EE and MicroProfile runtime build from scratch. A distinguishing feature is that it's build from the ground up to use Jakarta EE and MicroProfile as a framework, which means without any (application) server bits. This is essentially how you would use a mock framework for Jakarta EE, except that with Piranha it's the actual runtime. Piranha Micro takes the framework bits and with a minimal amount of glue code assembles these into what resembles a more traditional Jakarta EE Server (including an HTTP stack and the ability to run a single war archive). We'll be blogging about some interesting features this version of Piranha has soon. For now just a small status update, and that's that we're working hard on compatibility. Last month we passed the MicroProfile JWT TCK (which infers a certain minimal level of compatibility with CDI, Jakarta REST and MicroProfile Config…

The productive standup

Image
Timeboxing is a very simple technique to manage time and become more productive. Our OmniDevs have honed this technique to perfection!
Here they are in their daily standup with scrum master Robert:(click on the image for a larger version) Stay tuned for the next instalment!

Estimations are easy!

Image
Now for something a little different on this blog, though still in the domain of development. Today we're introducing "The OmniDevs", a comic strip dedicated to our daily struggles as developers in this exciting, but at times crazy, place we call the software industry. Without further ado, let's kick off with the first episode which is about the "favourite" pastime of most devs out there: estimating our work! (click on the image for a larger version) Stay tuned for the next instalment!

Java EE Survey 2018 - results

Image
At OmniFaces we poll the community from time to time about Java EE and related technologies. With all the changes that are about to happen with the move of Java EE to Eclipse and the subsequent renaming to Jakarta EE, we expanded the survey a little for this year. In the 2018 edition, there were 4 categories of questions: Current usage of Java EEServlet containersAPIs related to Java EEThe future of Java EE / Jakarta EE Jakarta EE provides the opportunity to revitalise and modernise Java EE, but in order to do that it's more important than ever that we know what matters to all of its users out there. We started the survey the 15th of March, 2018. Unfortunately a small barrage of other surveys would soon follow, among others the Eclipse Jakarta EE Survey, the Jakarta EE Logo selection, and the Baeldung survey. Despite all those other surveys going on at the same time we still managed to get 1054 respondents. Not as much as we hoped for, but still enough to have some idea of wh…